Why Does My Vagina Swell After Sex?

Swelling in the vulva during sexual arousal is common and often goes away shortly afterward. However, if it persists or is itchy, you should see your doctor.

The vulva engorges during sexual arousal to prepare for intercourse. But, if the swelling continues hours or even days later, it may be a sign that things were too rough or that you weren’t properly lubricated.

Allergic reaction to semen or sperm

It’s common to assume that redness, itching, and swelling in the vagina after sex is caused by something like a yeast infection or an STD. But according to the International Society for Sexual Medicine, these symptoms can actually be a sign of an allergic reaction to semen, also called seminal plasma hypersensitivity.

Symptoms of this condition (also known as post-orgasmic illness syndrome) include itching, swelling, and flu-like symptoms that appear right after ejaculation and can last 2-7 days. They occur only when you come into contact with semen and can be triggered by skin contact or sex. In severe cases, this allergy can cause a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis.

Fortunately, there are ways to desensitize yourself to semen, including using barrier methods such as condoms and lubrication before intercourse. You can also try eating plain yogurt and increasing your intake of probiotics, which can help reduce inflammation. If your symptoms persist, consult with your doctor. They may recommend using a treatment like intravaginal graded challenge, which involves placing diluted semen into the vagina at regular intervals to build up tolerance.

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STIs

A swollen vulva after sex could be the result of a sexually transmitted infection (STI). If this is the case, it’s important to take all necessary precautions and visit your doctor immediately. They may perform a pelvic exam or collect a genital swab to diagnose the cause of the swelling.

In some cases, a swollen vulva after a sexual encounter is caused by an allergic reaction to semen or sperm. This can range from mild itching to a full-blown allergic reaction. A swollen vagina can also be the result of an allergic reaction to certain soaps, lubricants, pads, or tampons. If you suspect that you have an allergy to a specific product, discontinue its use and consult with a gynecologist.

Rough intercourse is another possible reason for a swollen vagina after sex. This is especially true if the vagina is not properly lubricated. Rough sex can create intense friction that can tear sensitive vaginal tissues. Avoiding rough sex and using a good lubricant can help prevent this from happening. It’s also a good idea to wear loose clothing and to switch positions frequently during intercourse to reduce friction.

Yeast infection

Yeast (Candidia) lives in various places in the body, including the mouth, digestive tract and vagina. Usually, the “good” bacteria in these areas keep Candida at bay, but sometimes it gets out of control and causes symptoms such as a yeast infection, or vulva candidiasis. Yeast infections cause itching, pain and redness of the vagina or vulva. Some women also experience a thick, white discharge that looks like cottage cheese. In severe cases, the itchiness can lead to tiny cuts in the vulva and a burning sensation when you pee.

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If you suspect you have a yeast infection, try switching to a different lubricant and avoid using products that contain soaps or sulfates in the vagina. A gynecologist may also recommend that you use a nonlatex condom and a probiotic supplement. You can also take over-the-counter antifungal medication to relieve the itchiness and inflammation. However, be sure to see a doctor if your symptoms persist or worsen. They can prescribe oral or vaginal antifungal medications if needed. Yeast infections are typically mild and clear up within a few days.

Rough intercourse

Rough sex can cause the labium, which is the fold of skin that covers the vaginal opening, to become engorged with blood. This is a normal part of sexual arousal and is nothing to worry about. However, if your labium becomes swollen and itchy after sexual activity, it could be an indication of a serious problem like an infection or an allergic reaction to lubrication.

Cellulitis is a bacterial infection that causes swelling, pain and redness of the labium and vulva. It usually occurs in the outer region of the vulva, but can also occur on the underarms and buttocks. It can be caused by a number of factors, including an infection, pregnancy or improper hygiene.

The key to avoiding labial swelling after sex is prevention and using proper lubrication. A good quality lubricant can reduce friction during stimulation and penetration, which can prevent abrasions that lead to labial swelling. It is also important to use slow, gentle thrusts during intercourse to avoid painful or uncomfortable swelling. Lastly, remember to always communicate with your partner during rough sex and to be sure to establish clear boundaries and use the safe word.

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Pregnancy

Women often experience a swollen vagina after sex because of the pregnancy. This occurs because the body increases blood flow around the pelvic area to support the growing fetus. During intercourse, the extra blood flow may cause friction and irritation to vulvar tissues. If you are pregnant and have experienced swollen labia, it’s important to talk to your doctor about this issue.

If you don’t have a doctor, you can also visit a sexual health clinic in your area to get tested for an infection or STI. These clinics have doctors that specialize in genital diseases and can provide you with the treatment that you need. They can also recommend lubrication that will help reduce friction during intercourse and prevent painful swelling after sex. In some cases, a swollen vagina after sexual activity is caused by using an ineffective lubricant or an allergic reaction to the lube or condom you are using. It’s important to find a lubricant that will work best for you and use it every time you have sex. In addition, you should avoid using harsh cleansers or soaps on your vulva and only wash it with gentle, non-irritating products.

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